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 Post subject: End of an Era: Last of Drews Variety Stores Set to Close
PostPosted: Wed Oct 31, 2007 3:54 pm 
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The last remaining Drews Variety Store is shuttering its doors in Wauwatosa. See Link: http://www.onmilwaukee.com/market/articles/drews.html

I have fond memories of the Drews in downtown Greendale (in the space now occupied by the Library). I remember buying model kits and other goodies there as a kid.

What are your favorite memories of Drews?


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 Post subject: Re: End of an Era: Last of Drews Variety Stores Set to Close
PostPosted: Wed Oct 31, 2007 6:20 pm 
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William Attewell wrote:
What are your favorite memories of Drews?

The squeaky wood floors, and I think the area back by the models and toys had a slight ramp. Gave the place character.
Joe


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2007 10:44 am 
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As a kid, nothing was better than Drews. If we brought home a good report card we could walk to Drews and pick out a reward. We loved that! That store was such a jumble of cool stuff. My mom would often shop there for her crochet & needlepoint supplies. I always went with her, even if I wasn't allowed to buy anything. It was just fun to wander around and check out all the merchandise.

I loved growing up in the Village. We liked Viele's candy selection - it wasn't the usual stuff found everywhere else. We'd also beg to be able to go to the Cone Shop after dinner. It was always hard to decide between getting a slushie or one of the cones dipped in that warm chocolate that would harden on top of the custard. Decisons, decisions...being a kid wasn't easy!!

Even the tiny library was great. It felt so cozy. When Sentry moved & the Village slowly became a Ghost Town it was so depressing. I was so happy the day I found out that Roy R. was on a mission to bring the Village back to life. Now my kids enjoy when we go down there to browse. Gosh, I'm old!!


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 06, 2007 5:13 pm 
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 Post subject: 'fessin' up
PostPosted: Sun Nov 25, 2007 10:13 pm 
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Drew's Variety Store--sigh
Some pleasant memories and a painful one. The building was smaller then, as additions have since been built on and the Associated Bank building was not there at all. The original building can be traced by looking at the differences in the brick.

And then again Drew's was only one of three stores in that smaller building, with Trimborn's Grocery on the south end, Drew's in the middle and Des Jardin's Drug Store (and soda fountain) on the north end. How small those stores must have been by today's standards.

One fine summer day (but then, weren't they all?) I was on the side of our house digging a small hole to hide something. What the thing was, I do not rememeber, but my all-seeing mother saw me and asked what I was doing. Well, I stammered and hemmed and hawed, but she eventually drug out of me that I had something I had taken from Drew's without paying for it. (A woman ahead of her time who should be down at Gitmo where she wouldn't need no stinkin' waterboarding to get at the truth.) She promptly latched on to my ear and marched me back over to Drew's, where I was insructed to lay my ill-gotten gains on the counter and explain to the clerk what I had done and apologize for my actions. Once I had complied, my ear was finally released from the iron grip. (Something about growing up on a northern Wisconsin farm before milking machines were invented gave a mother fingers of iron and a vise-like ear grip.) It was then explained to the lady behind the counter that I was no longer allqwed in the store, as if the embarrassment alone would not have kept me away.
Thus, so simply and quickly, was a life of crime nipped in the bud.

Does anyone remember Tom's Hobby Shop, which I believe was about where the coffee shop is now?


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 Post subject: Re: 'fessin' up
PostPosted: Mon Nov 26, 2007 9:00 pm 
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Spud- a common tater wrote:
Does anyone remember Tom's Hobby Shop, which I believe was about where the coffee shop is now?

I always thought it was where the bay is at Great Harvest. Anyway, that was before my time, but I have a bit of family history from there as well. One year my mom and her mom couldn't figure out what to get my dad for his birthday. They saw an HO scale Mantua General locomotive (i.e. the Great Locomotive chase), and bought it for him. It sat, unused, until I was about three years old when my dad thought model railroading might be a good father/son hobby. I doubt mom and grandma could have envisioned then what one simple purchase started. :D

Yes, I still have the locomotive and it still runs.
Joe


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 Post subject: Re: End of an Era: Last of Drews Variety Stores Set to Close
PostPosted: Mon Mar 15, 2010 11:04 pm 
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Ron 80, Thanks for the picture. It brought back lots of fun memories.My dad worked for the Drews family for over thirty years, mainly at the store in Hales Corners. I grew up in Greendale, out by Martin Luther HS and spent countless hours as a kid in the store and helping my dad later on. I can't tell you how many 4th of July parades I marched in with the Drews float in both Hales Corners and Greendale. We were good friends with the whole Drews family, who incidently also lived in Greendale. Now I teach high school in Wausau, and I love telling the story of "My hometown" in my American history class when we study the Great Depression and New Deal.


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 Post subject: Re: End of an Era: Last of Drews Variety Stores Set to Close
PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2012 12:26 pm 
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I remember Tom's Hobby Shop being across the bay from Drews. I dropped into Tom’s periodically after Cub Scouts got me interested in model cars. The open bay separated Drews from the rest of the shops on the west side of the Broad Street strip. I remember Drews as the place where my brother and I bought short-sleeve t-shirts off a rack – white shirts with green trim and numerals. We’d wear those shirts a lot – pretending we were on a team – when we’d play ball in our backyard. The Greendale movie theater doors used to be on the south-facing façade of that bay, sort of around the corner from Tom’s. The old Layton State Bank once had its operation right next to (north of) Tom’s or very close to it. It later moved to a newer building father south down Broad Street and on the east side (about a block or two south of Schoolway), next to a dentist’s office (which I also went to). I haven’t been in the village for 10 years, so I’m not sure where the coffee shop is that someone mentioned earlier. But another store I would drop into a lot as a teen was Hartman’s TV and Applianace, which was at the north end of the west strip, just south of the old Village Inn. In addition to appliances, Hartman’s sold vinyl records – 45s and 33 rpms – and had a “record club” you could join: Buy a certain number of 45s, and you’d get one free. That’s where I bought the majority of my 45s – and also where I got the first album (33 rpm) I ever owned. On weekends while in high school, I’d occasionally order pizza from Charlie’s, a pizzeria that was behind Hartman’s, fronting Municipal Drive. Charlie’s might still be there. Charlie’s made great pizza back then; I can’t say I’ve ever had any better pizza than the ones Charlie’s made back then. Across Broad Street on the east side of the business district, I remember dropping into the drugstore to get popsicles after grade school during warm-weather months. The barbershop I’d go to was in another store on that side; a hairdressing salon was nearby. There also was a grocery at the far south end (Trimborn’s? later Krambo?) and Dobner’s Liquor Store at the north end. While I was still in town, Sentry Foods opened in a new stand-alone building south of Drews and next to the post office on the west side of Broad Street. I worked about a year or so at the Village Inn as a bus boy while in high school. Very hard job. Ginny Bykowski ran the restaurant portion of the business; she’d ride her staff very hard, and her facial expressions always conveyed huge stress. You saw a rare soft side of her only at the end of the night, when customers had cleared out and she could remove the work face. Her husband, Bill, tended bar. He wasn’t as much the whip-cracker as Ginny. They booked live combos (which played mostly country music or pre-rock-era standards) that played on Friday and Saturday nights.


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 18, 2012 2:14 pm 
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What I remember, although memory can be so treacherous anymore, north to south:

The Village Inn was where the Harmony is now.

Next the Post Office was on the first floor, where the investment company is now, with Dr. Brown and Dr. Gabriel (dentist) upstairs

Next, although I am not sure of the order, came: Casey's Grill, Harris's Barber Shop and Vento,s Shoes.
(Vento's Shoes had the coolest machine to check for proper fit. You would look in the viewer on the top of the machine, put your foot in an opening on the bottom and wiggle your toes. You could see the bones in your foot move around. I don't think they have those anymore. Nowadays kids have to get their daily dose of rays from computer screens, TVs and cell phones.)

Next was Layton Park State Bank, although they have since dropped the 'Park' from their name.

Around the south side of the bank was the theater entrance.

Where the library is now was Des Jardins Drug Store, Drews Variety Store and Trimborn's Market


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 Post subject: Re: End of an Era: Last of Drews Variety Stores Set to Close
PostPosted: Sun Jun 09, 2013 1:43 pm 
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I can't remember Tom's Hobby Shop. I was around a little earlier- grad. GHS in 1954. I can remember Kutz's Hobby shop, College Av? SE of Greendale- run by Julius Kutz, and son H.S. schoolmate Bennett Kutz- wonderful family. I spent many days out there, watching the u-control planes, dog fights, and buying model kits at their store. Can't find the house/store any more, since the area has been developed. The house was right on the South side of the Root River, and they flew the models on both sides of the river. We flew u-control planes in Greendale, in the park between Broadway and Berry Ct.


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